Green Pack to replace LM567

Dear all

We have a big problem related to the shortage  of LM567 and we need to replace this component.

Do you think is possible implement the LM567 functionality using Green Pacl tecnology?

Thanks for any suggestion

M

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  • I indeed see many thousands of LM567 on stock both at Mouser and LCSC, so I fail to see any shortage.

    That said, if you read the documentation of the LM567, you will read that it is based on a phase locked loop that tries to lock on the input signal. Therefore my approach to replace it would be to build a phase locked loop myself based on an industry standard 74HC4046. Designing a PLL yourself requires a bit of fundamental electronics theory, I consider the Philips PLL Design Guide the best documentation on this topic. It may look daunting at first with all the math, but the MS-DOS program you find at the link as well is quite good, does all the math for you and allows you to design a PLL that is able to lock within the required frequency range rather quickly.

    Once you have designed a PLL can that can lock on the input signal, the rest of the job is really simple: The PLL converts frequency to voltage, and the 74HC4046 conveniently buffers this signal for you at its demodulator output pin 10. Then all that remains is to feed it to one or multiple comparators or an A/D converter in order to check whether the frequency (thus pin 10 voltage) is within the required range. You can of course use the comparators and/or A/D converters of a GreenPAK for this purpose.

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  • I indeed see many thousands of LM567 on stock both at Mouser and LCSC, so I fail to see any shortage.

    That said, if you read the documentation of the LM567, you will read that it is based on a phase locked loop that tries to lock on the input signal. Therefore my approach to replace it would be to build a phase locked loop myself based on an industry standard 74HC4046. Designing a PLL yourself requires a bit of fundamental electronics theory, I consider the Philips PLL Design Guide the best documentation on this topic. It may look daunting at first with all the math, but the MS-DOS program you find at the link as well is quite good, does all the math for you and allows you to design a PLL that is able to lock within the required frequency range rather quickly.

    Once you have designed a PLL can that can lock on the input signal, the rest of the job is really simple: The PLL converts frequency to voltage, and the 74HC4046 conveniently buffers this signal for you at its demodulator output pin 10. Then all that remains is to feed it to one or multiple comparators or an A/D converter in order to check whether the frequency (thus pin 10 voltage) is within the required range. You can of course use the comparators and/or A/D converters of a GreenPAK for this purpose.

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